Horror and Comics!

Comic and Horror lovers!!! Listen up!!!

There is this book called IN THE DARK. It’s a comic horror anthology. It’s brilliant and I do not say that lightly. You may notice it’s out through IDW, but it was originally a Kickstarter by the phenomenally talented Rachel Autumn Deering. A rising horror star in the comics community. Rachel put together this magnificent anthology with talent such as Steve Niles, Batman’s Scott Snyder, the brilliant Paul Tobin, Tim Seeley, Ed Brisson, Duane Swierczynski and so many more. This is a massive work of horror art and you’d be ridiculous not to get your hands on it.

7ef1bb603029bd7effc09130f5489e34_large

You can buy it online, sure. But you can also contact Rachel and buy directly from her. Which is what I highly recommend. Because this was a Kickstarter, she has a ton of copies. Running a successful Kickstarter campaign is not all fun and flowers. It’s extremely difficult and the cost on the creator is insane. If you’re going to order this book (which, have I mentioned already that you REALLY SHOULD?), order it directly from Rachel (drop her a message on FB: https://www.facebook.com/theironrachel).

Support artists who are taking chances, being bold, thinking outside of the box, and making a difference in the pulling industry.

Check out Bloody Disgusting’s 5 Skull review here! http://bloody-disgusting.com/reviews/3292704/5-skull-review-dark-horror-anthology/

Hallowe’en Extravaganza!

skeleton-clip-art-15UPDATE!

We only have to wait a week now! Next week I will post the first contest. Get ready for some crazy halloween fun!

—————

Yea. So what if I start preparing for Hallowe’en in August. I still have a bride and groom skeleton set hanging from my window from last year. In my world, everyday is Hallowe’en.

We won’t start any of the festivities until Oct. 1st (whimper heard around the world). But I wanted everyone to be aware that there WILL be festivities. I had to take last year off, but I’ll more than make up for it this year!

I already have some amazing books from extremely generous publishers like Little, Brown, Walker, Quirk Books, and Abrams, lined up for giveaways. Ghosts, skeletons, murderers, maniacs, and good old spooky fun haunt these pages.

There will be contests to win books. And they are difficult contests. They involve writing, and reminiscing, maybe some old Hallowe’en pictures?! There will be plenty of books, thus plenty of creepy contests.

Get ready…

Set…

Wait a month and a half…

REPOST: How to: When writers want authors to Guest Blog…

While speaking at the wonderful Whidbey Island Writers Conference this past weekend, I was asked a question: “If you’re not a literary agent, how do you get an author to agree to appear on your blog?” Oooohhhh. It struck me that it must seem MUCH harder than it actually is to interview an author for your blog or to have them guest blog for you. So raise your sword because I swear by the power of Grayskull…you can do this.

…and here is how, aka, follow the pictures.

Pick an author. For our purposes, we will choose an author that has appeared on This Literary Life: Gitty Daneshvari. Author of the School of Fear series.

Now, there is a reason I chose Gitty. It wasn’t a random choice. I KNOW my readers. They are writers and they write children’s books. This was a calculated choice. You do not want to feature an author whom none of your readers will identify with. Plus, Gitty is just absolutely fantastic.

So, I’ve selected my author. The next thing you will want to do is get in contact with your author. Sometimes you will not be able to do this, and that’s just a fact. But for every author who does not put contact info on their Web site, there is an author that does. So I head on over here:

Then I went here:

Can you feel it? We’re getting closer…

VOILA! So the truth is, the easy part is over. Now you write an EXTREMELY polite and informative email to the author and…WAIT. DO NOT PESTER. I don’t think I can stress that enough. Write once, and wait. If they never get back to you, move on.

So this was my next step:

It took her a few days to respond, and we found a time that worked for HER (do not make this about yourself, they are doing you a huge favor. You work on their time schedule).

A word about blogs: Always tag and use categories on your blog!!! When tagging or using categories, use “hot words” like Gitty Daneshvari and School of Fear and Middle Grade Books, etc. “Hot words” are words that people use in a Google search. You do this so that your blog has a higher chance of appearing when someone searches these words. Advice: Look through your entire blog post after you have finished writing it and think to yourself: what key words or ideas are used in this post that people would Google search? Then tag them or use them in the categories.

Also, use images. Not only does it make reading a blog post much more exciting, but when people Google Image Search for Gitty Daneshvari, the image I used of Gitty will appear with the many others, and will drive traffic to my blog.

ALWAYS feed your blog link through other social media sites: Twitter, Facebook, etc.

**It’s important to remember that authors are people too. Which means a few things: They love to promote their books, as well they should. It also means that they have crazy hectic lives just like all of us, and “no” is very much a reasonable answer. So, be patient, choose wisely, and remember that “if you never ask, you’ll never get.”

a word on creativity…

“Creativity comes from trust. Trust your instincts. And never hope more than you work.”-Rita Mae Brown

Often times I find myself standing at the edge of a cliff. Arms out, eyes closed. Although I can feel the exhilaration of the decision I am about to make, there is always a bit of hesitation. But falling slowing into the ravine always turns out to be the most exciting creative act I could ever do.

Sometimes I break an arm. Sometimes I end up with a headache. Often times I realize it’s a lot of work to find a successful life for myself inside that ravine. But I always trust my instincts. And through that essential trust in myself, I find creativity in myself. And it’s my creativity that ultimately makes that jump.

I’m once again plugging Underneath The Juniper Tree because it is the embodiment of all that is creative. In addition to pushing your creative boundaries, it pushes your comfort zones. Both of these things lead to becoming a better writer. Which I assume is your goal since you are reading this post write now.

(A piece from UTJT)

Check out the NOVEMBER ISSUE and learn from all of those who have made that leap into the dark ravine of creativity.

 

Contest worthy of a Princess!

The girls at Princess Prep: The Royal Academy are beyond sugar and spice: they’re sassy, snarky, witty, and sometimes nice – but always, always stylish! Now YOU are cordially invited to style along with them, just like a real princess, in our Princess Prep Virtual Style Contest!

Before...

After...

The co-authors and illustrator of Princess Prep, Jessica Elizabeth Cole & J. David McKenney, have designed three “virtual” paper dolls: Bennie (our story’s heroine), Simone (the bad girl leader of the “Parasol Mafia”), and Prissy (all-around-sweetheart member of the “Cupcake Club”).

With these three virtual paper dolls, YOU have the opportunity to create the most stylish Princess you can. Remember, at Princess Prep, style is everything!

Visit the fabulous world of Princess Prep: The Royal Academy and click on the “Contest” tab for information and guidelines! 

Contest ends October 10th!

Visit and “like” us on facebook for up-to-date information, and follow the girls on Twitter @itsprincessprep!

The Choice to Go Indie by author Lisa Rivero

“Everywhere we look, big things and small things, material things and lifestyle things, life is a matter of choice… And the question is, is this good news, or bad news? And the answer is yes.” ~ Barry Schwartz

I teach a college course titled “Contemporary Issues in the Humanities,” and one of my favorite TED Talks to show and to discuss is The Paradox of Choice, by Barry Schwartz, based on his book by the same name. Schwartz’s analysis of today’s plethora of choices as being both good news and bad news is spot on for writers. Just a few years ago, a writer with a finished manuscript who wanted to be published had two choices, three at the most: seek an agent or submit the manuscript directly to publishers as an author. The third possibility–self-publishing with a vanity press–came at both financial expense and a potential cost to one’s professional reputation.

Today, however, the number of choices can seem overwhelming: agent or direct submission? Self-publish? If self-publishing, ebook or paper or both? Distribute on Kindle or Nook or something else? Offered at what price? At what stage of revision?

The good news is that more choices give writers more control. We’ve all heard the stories of famous authors and highly acclaimed books that were rejected ten, twenty, or more times before being published. What if they had given up? Or died?

This summer, I made the decision to self-publish a work of historical fiction for children, Oscar’s Gift: Planting Words with Oscar Micheaux. When I wrote the book, self-publishing was the furthest thing from my mind. In fact, I wasn’t thinking much about publishing at all during the book’s creation. This was both a change and a relief for me, as my four previous non-fiction books had all been written only after I’d secured a commitment from a publisher. As much as I value the security of having a book contract in hand, I’ve also found that I enjoy writing more when I write as I did when I first began freelancing, “on spec.”

Oscar, as I’ve come to call this particular project, was different in other ways, as well. It was my first work of fiction, other than short stories, as well as my first book for elementary-age children. Oscar grew from personal history (that of a farm girl with the dream of being a writer), a sense of place (rural South Dakota), and an immersion in a historical figure and time period (homesteader, novelist, and film maker Oscar Micheaux at the turn of the 20th century). In the spring of 2010, the book landed an agent. This was new, as well. I’d been lucky (or naive) enough to have published without an agent to this point. But more about that at the end of the piece.

While I am by no means an expert in indie authorship at this point, I want to share my reasons for choosing this road and offer some possible takeaways for other writers.

Why I Chose to Go Indie

 

1. Publishing Trends. The topic and tone of Oscar are a hard sell in today’s traditional children’s market, which is geared more and more toward fast commercial success. Much of the feedback we received from editors about Oscar’s Gift had to do with current trends and expectations. Some noted that the figure of Micheaux is not well known. Others felt that the book could have a “strong life” in libraries and schools but would not “break out” in today’s market. My friends half-joked that I should add a prairie vampire or dystopian plot twist.

Had the overall response been less positive toward the book itself or pointed toward more sweeping editorial changes, I would have considered a complete overhaul and resubmission. As it was, I briefly considered re-writing the novel for adults, or following the idea of one editor to transform the story into a picture book. In the end, though, I knew this was the story I wanted to tell, with this particular young protagonist and for this particular age range. I was well aware that mine is a quiet book told in a classic children’s style (an attribute my agent helped me to see) rather than a trendy blockbuster, and I wanted to give it the chance for that possible strong and long life in schools and libraries, as well as an audience of, perhaps, intense and quiet readers.

The Takeaway: Pay attention to feedback. One negative comment is no cause for weeping and wailing, but a general trend of suggestions can be very useful. Never be afraid to revise. That’s what writers do. At the same time, be careful to discern criticism about your writing from analysis of marketing potential, and spend some time thinking about your book’s readership.

2. Surprised by a Platform. My best writing buddy helped me to realize early this summer that, rather than think of myself as building a platform, I needed to realize I am already standing on one, and it’s high time I use it. This took me completely by surprise. I’ve been blogging for only a little over a year and consider myself still a beginner, and, I’m not always comfortable with the social aspect of social media. However, I’d forgotten about the other planks that make up a platform: public speaking events, articles and guest pieces, involvement in organizations. After my friend’s nudge, I decided to test the waters, and I queried Psychology Today about writing a blog in my area of non-fiction expertise. By the end of the day, literally, I had my own PT blog, “Creative Synthesis,’ which is yet another platform plank, ready to be nailed in place.

I guess my friend was right.

As I considered the self-publishing option, I reminded myself that I have a bit of a base with which to market and promote a book. My name may not be as recognizable as Lois Lowry, but I have a start, built over several years, and that’s something.

The Takeaway: Platforms can’t be built overnight, and they are more about involvement, persistence, and relationships than they are about rankings and followers. I think that the reason I didn’t see the platform underneath my feet was that I was having so much fun building it! The idea of a platform has always seemed dry and business-like to me, and I cringe–just a little–when I heard the word. But maybe the best platforms are also about following your bliss, in the best Joseph Campbell sense, and not being afraid to connect on a deep and real level with others who share your interest and passion. This kind of platform is very hard to begin building from scratch simultaneous with self-publishing.

3. Getting in the Flow of Formatting. Unless you are willing to pay someone to prepare your ebook files or print-on-demand paperback (I wasn’t), you need to know or be open to learning some computer skills and even some programming. If you already have some experience with writing html web pages and using css style sheets, and if you have a good eye for page and cover design, then the process of getting your books in the hands and on the screens of readers might be fun. It was for me.

However, if you have little patience for or interest in more than the most basic of word processing, if you are a writer who just wants to write, period, then self-publishing could be one big, expensive headache.

As a college teacher of technical writing, I have some background in this area, and I still became frustrated at times. The biggest mistake I made was not to label all of my files-in-progress along the way. Because I wanted to make the ebook edition look as nice as it could in all formats, I had separate files for Kindle, Nook, and Smashwords, and, at one point, I couldn’t tell which was the most recent versions and uploaded the wrong files (they were soon fixed). The next time, I’m going to make separate folders for each ereader and use a dating system in the file names, as well as immediately archiving older versions, where they are out of the way but not gone entirely.

The Takeaway: Self-publishing is a big commitment of time, energy, and skill. The skills are not difficult, but they are not necessarily pleasurable nor do they come easily for everyone. If you don’t want to pay for these services, make sure you give yourself plenty of time to learn the ropes and to practice before publishing your masterpiece.

4. Ready for a Learning Curve. Oscar has been written, revised, submitted, critiqued, formatted, and is now available in paperback, for Kindle and Nook and soon for iBooks. For me, though, the hard work is just beginning.

Some of you who are reading this may thrive on promotion and marketing and social media. I envy you. I’m the girl who got her parents to buy all of the candy bars or wreaths or whatever else I had to sell for school organizations. I know, however, that Oscar needs a champion in order to be read, and that champion is me. So I’m ready to put aside fears of what others might think (the “Who does she think she is?” kind of fears), ready to research and apply what has worked for other authors, and ready to share this next leg of my journey on my own blog, so that others can learn from my mistakes and, I hope, some small success. In the end, I hope to grow a little as a person, as well.

The Takeaway: Whether it’s revision and textual polishing, or ebook and paperback formatting, or marketing and publicity, some aspect of self-publishing will probably be uncomfortable for you. Are you willing to go there? To ride out the learning curve? To commit yourself for the long haul? To risk not meeting your expectations and having nowhere for the buck to stop but at your feet?

The Big Takeaway

I want to end with a story about relationships and the answer to a question that may have crossed your mind: Why am I writing about indie authorship on an agent’s blog? When my agent, whose name happens to be Bree Ogden, and I decided to let the contract for Oscar lapse after a year of submissions (not at all a long time, by the way, in the world of agent submissions), I was more than a little sad, even though we came to the decision mutually. She loved the story of 11-year-old Tomas and Oscar from the start, and she helped me to see it and value it in a new way. Once I decided to self-publish the book, I was unsure of how my decision might affect our relationship. As the launch date grew nearer, however, I knew that I needed to reach out.

My email brought the most gracious, supportive response from Bree I could imagine. You see, we writers often forget that writing and publishing is nothing if not about relationships. I learned that lesson with my first publisher ten years ago, whose professional support, mentorship, and friendship continue to sustain and to guide me to this day.

We write in the hopes not just to sell books, but to have a special relationship with readers, and anyone who believes in the power of books is part of that relationship. And, in that, there is no bad news.

~Lisa Rivero

For more information on how to get your hands on a copy of Lisa’s new book, see here.

IMPORTANT: This link outlines many of the realistic expectations indie authors should have (counteracting the ebook-millionaire myth) and shows that self-publishing isn’t the right choice for every author or every book.

Guest post: Maribeth Graham talks about THE WRITER’S 7 DAY DIET PLAN

THE WRITER’S 7 DAY DIET PLAN (Healthy Tips to Get Yourself Motivated)

A writer, much like a dieter must acquire healthy habits if they wish to achieve their goals. A writer will not become successful without determination, dedication, willpower, daily exercise (writing related of course) and support. Immediate results should not be expected.

Below is a 7 day diet plan to help get your pen writing and your mind thinking. If you experience a set back, brush yourself off and start over. What you write today may be what gets you noticed tomorrow. [Agent Bree says: Brilliant!]

Day 1- Spend thirty minutes writing uninterrupted.

Day 2- Get Outside! Take a walk. Observe your surroundings. Take in the scenery. Pay attention to details. You might stumble upon a great setting, an interesting character, or a situation that inspires a story.

Day 3- Keep a journal. Document your observations. Write about anything and everything. A journal is a great way to outline your thoughts and jot down facts. Keep track of your writing habits. Do you prefer to write as soon as you get up or right before you go to sleep?

Day 4- Find a support group. There are millions of other writers out there that are willing to help you achieve your goals. Critique groups are invaluable. What you fail to see in your own writing a fellow writer may be able to pick out immediately. A writer cannot become successful without the help of other writers. [Agent Bree says: This is crucial for such a solitary career.]

Day 5- Exercise! Writing exercises provide great inspiration and motivation. Visit http://underneaththejunipertree.blogspot.com/ for great writing challenges. Writing exercises help jog your mind and can awaken sleeping stories.

Day 6- Cut out fillers. Set aside time to edit your writing. Eliminate all unnecessary words. Discover your stories inner beauty by trimming all superfluous material. Remember many times less is more.

Day 7- Drink up knowledge. Research what you are writing about. [Agent Bree says: YES!If you are writing fiction that does not mean everything can be made up. If you want your readers to take you seriously you cannot talk about a flower blooming in May that only blooms in June.

Following this diet for one week will put you on the “write path”. Incorporating these tips into your daily routine will allow you to form healthy writing habits. Over time, you will find yourself doing a few of these suggestions more than once a day. Attempting to do them all in one day can prove to be overwhelming and interfere with your maximum production. Do you have tips you would like to share? What works for you? Good luck in all your writing endeavors and don’t forget to spend snack time reading.

-Maribeth Graham

Follow her on twitter: @YolaRamunno

*If you would like to guest post, email me at bree@martinliterarymanagement.com